Pet Advice from Nurse Bec

The Importance of Desexing


As a rescue, our aim is to help animals in need and find them forever homes where they can be loved and cared for. One of the ways we do this is by desexing animals before rehoming.


Desexing has many health and behaviour benefits including:

  • Reduced risk of mammary cancers
  • Reduces annoying behaviours
  • Eliminates urine spraying & marking
  • Stops unwanted pregnancies
  • Reduces the likelihood of straying
  • Reduces aggressive behaviours
  • Reduces the spread of disease

Desexing also ensures that an animal cannot reproduce which in turn helps reduce the number of unwanted animals living their lives on the streets, breaking the cycle.

A single cat that remains un-desexed on the streets can lead in the reproduction of up to 500 cats and kittens in a single year! Check out the image below for more information.

Desexing can make the world of difference

So How Can You Help?

If you plan to adopt a new feline friend, ensure they are desexed before you purchase.

Sadly, there are many people wanting to do the right thing but who go about it in the wrong way with strays and unwanted litters often given away for free online or between friends.

The issue here is that the veterinary side of things (desexing, microchipping, vaccinating etc) is often not done and it just takes one accident; a single door to be left open, a noise to frighten them or the smell of pheromones from the neighbourhood stray; for some cats to get out into the world and become another street statistic.

By desexing early however, you minimise these risks and are also helping keep cats and kittens everywhere safer. This in turn helps stop the spread of diseases such as Feline Aids, Panleukopenia (feline parvo), Calicivirus and Chlamydia; all diseases that if left untreated can cause unnecessary suffering and even slow death in cats and kittens. These diseases can also be spread to pets who wander into stray territory or get into cat fights too.

Thankfully, desexing also helps reduce the chances of a cat straying, fighting or becoming lost. Too often we hear of pets who get lost sadly the statistics for reuniting a cat with their owner, especially if they’re not desexed (and even more so if they’re not microchipped either) is very low which is very sad. The stray population continues to grow as the suburbs do and as people continue to feed and welcome strays onto their property.

Another way you can help is by assisting in the rescue of strays. You can reach out to us, the council or other rescue groups for tips and advice if a stray cat in your neighbourhood needs assistance.

Finally, the best thing you can do is adopt from a reputable rescue and help break the cycle.

Most rescue groups, just like us here at BFFR are small and run independently by dedicated volunteers who put in their own time and money to helping animals. By adopting a pet, by  sharing our story and by spreading the news about rescues just like us, you become part of our community and allow us to continue to support animals in need.


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